Summer Sports

Summer Sports

In the summertime, everyone's thoughts turn to the outdoors. We want to get out in the sun and have some fun. Some people do exercise outdoors, such as running, walking, and biking, all year long regardless of the weather.1 For others, summer's warmer temperatures make activity outside the house or the gym more inviting, and tennis courts, basketball courts, soccer fields, and baseball diamonds become filled with younger and older athletes, all looking to bounce, hit, or kick a ball around with their friends and opponents. Other summer activities include surfing and rollerblading, and although these activities may also be done year round, many people prefer to get their boarding and blading in when temperatures are subjectively more conducive.

Summer sports provide substantial personal satisfaction as well as health and wellness benefits. Any exercise, after all, is good exercise. But exercise needs to be done in context. For example, if you haven't done any type of exercise since last summer, attempting to play three sets of tennis your first time on the court will likely lead to trouble, specifically, a strained muscle, sprained ligament, or worse. Similarly, trying to run up and down a basketball court or trying to leap to snag a sharp line drive during a baseball game may cause an immediate problem if you are out of condition.

The best course of action is to re-engage in summer sports slowly, a little at a time.2 Even better, of course, is to participate in a consistent program of regular vigorous exercise throughout the year. Federal and healthcare professional guidelines recommend doing at least 30 minutes of vigorous exercise five days a week. Engaging in an ideal program of cardiovascular exercise, strength training, and core exercise on a weekly basis provides a level of fitness that supports all types of summer sports.

Here’s why:

Strength training enables your body to bear heavy loads throughout full ranges of motion of various joint structures such as the ankle, knee, hip, and lower back.

Cardiovascular exercise increases the amount of blood your heart pumps on each beat and trains your lungs to take in more air on each breath.

Core exercises enhance your body's ability to support loads under suddenly changing three-dimensional forces such as twisting, pivoting, bending, and lifting.3

Regular chiropractic care supports all of your exercise and sporting activities, in addition to strengthening your immune system and optimizing the functioning of your nerve system, your body's master system. By detecting, analyzing, and correcting spinal misalignments and other sources of nerve irritation, regular chiropractic care helps ensure that you and your family will enjoy a summer filled with enjoyable activities. As well, regular chiropractic care helps ensure long-term health and wellness for you and your family throughout the year.

1Bezerra P, et al: The influence of winter and summer seasons on physical fitness in aged population. Arch Gerontol Geriatr 76:80-84, 2018

2Evans EW, et al: Promoting health and activity in the summer trial: Implementation and outcomes of a pilot study. Prev Med Rep 10:87-92, 2018

3Coulombe BJ, et al: Core Stability Exercise Versus General Exercise for Chronic Low Back Pain. J Athl Train 52(1):71-72, 2017


CONTACT US TODAY

We look forward to hearing from you

Locations

Find us on the map

Testimonials

Reviews By Our Satisfied Patients

  • "Dr. Leek is very experienced and has a great kind, personality. I highly recommend him. His massage therapists are also great."
    Patricia K. / Grass Valley, CA

Featured Articles

Read about interesting topics

  • Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    One of the leading causes of vision loss in people who are age 50 or older is age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This common eye condition leads to damage of a small spot near the center of the retina called the macula. The macula provides us with the ability to clearly see objects that are straight ...

    Read More
  • Diabetic Eye Diseases

    Diabetes is a condition that involves high blood sugar (glucose) levels. This can affect many parts of the body, including the eyes. One of the most common diabetic eye diseases is diabetic retinopathy, which is also a leading cause of blindness in American adults. Diabetic Retinopathy Diabetic retinopathy ...

    Read More
  • Presbyopia

    Somewhere around the age of 40, most people’s eyes lose the ability to focus on close-up objects. This condition is called presbyopia. You may start holding reading material farther away, because it is blurry up close. Reading suddenly gives you eyestrain. You might wonder when manufacturers started ...

    Read More
  • Laser Cataract Surgery

    The only way to correct the clouded vision caused by advanced cataracts is surgical intervention. If you find yourself pursuing cataract surgery to remove one or both cataract-disease lenses, you may be wondering what surgical approaches are available for treatment. Although eye surgeons have successfully ...

    Read More
  • Cataract Surgery

    With cataract surgery, your ophthalmologist removes the cataract-diseased lens of your eye. The ophthalmologist then replaces your natural lens with an artificial one. The Procedure This outpatient procedure is generally safe and takes less than an hour. Your ophthalmologist will dilate your pupil ...

    Read More
  • Fuchs' Corneal Dystrophy

    Fuchs' dystrophy (pronounced fooks DIS-truh-fee) is an eye disease characterized by degenerative changes to the cornea’s innermost layer of cells. The cause for Fuchs' dystrophy is not fully understood. If your mother or father has the disease, then there is roughly a 50 percent chance that you will ...

    Read More
  • Peripheral Vision Loss

    Normal sight includes central vision (the field of view straight ahead) and peripheral vision (the field of view outside the circle of central vision). The inability to see within a normal range of view often indicates peripheral vision loss. In severe cases of peripheral vision loss, individuals only ...

    Read More
  • Presbyopia

    As we age, our eyes—like the rest of our bodies—begin to lose flexibility and strength. When this happens to the lens of the eye and its surrounding muscles, your lens will become stiff. This makes it harder to see close objects clearly because the eyes can't focus properly. It's a natural part of ...

    Read More
  • Patches

    Eye patches are used to strengthen muscle control in weak eyes. By placing a patch over the strong eye, the weaker eye is forced to do the heavy lifting. While it may be uncomfortable for the patient at first, the muscle controlling the weaker eye will become tougher and more resilient. This will allow ...

    Read More
  • Nystagmus

    Nystagmus is a vision condition characterized by repetitive, uncontrolled eye movements. These involuntary eye movements may be side-to-side, up and down, or in a circular pattern, which hinders the eyes’ ability to focus on a steady object. Individuals with nystagmus may hold their heads in unusual ...

    Read More

Newsletter Sign Up